The Twickenham Historical District

potted_flowersThe first time I’d heard the name Twickenham, I thought it sounded like “Twinkie,” and I had laughed and laughed.  I had recently moved to Huntsville as a single, in search of a teaching job, and one of my college buddies had invited me to worship with her and her husband at Twickenham Church of Christ.  I, of course, had heard of London (duh) but not of Twickenham.

So Huntsville, Alabama has it’s own Twickenham Historical District that I love to walk through.  They have a walking tour that I need to take with Princess Buttercup this summer, and every Christmas I just get too busy to go on their “Spirit of Christmas Past Homes Tour” with luminaries.  One year they even had bagpipes, and one of my flautist friends also played there at Christmas.  Really, next year I need to schedule in time to go!!

According to their web site, The Twickenham Historical District Walking Tour, Twickenham is “Alabama’s largest antebellum district [consisting of] Federal, Italianate and classical architecture…”  The Weeden House was built in 1819, and is “Alabama’s oldest house open to public.”

The pictures that I took the other day give you a little idea of what I love so much about the Twickenham Historical District.
GreenHousepotted_flowers_edited-1

Church of the Nativity, Episcopal

Church of the Nativity, Episcopal

Twickenham5Twickenham4Twickenham3Twickenham2Twickenham1

Southern Small Town Style

Art Studio

Art Studio

I recently took these photos from the small north Alabama town of Athens. I composed them with the idea of just giving you a little sample of elements of the town’s style. Feel free to use them if you wish, but I would really appreciate if you give me the photo credit and link back to http://www.thewritesteph.com.

Traditional small town atmosphere juxtaposed with high-tech aerospace company.

Traditional small town atmosphere juxtaposed with high-tech aerospace company.

lion

This drug store serves up delicious coned ice cream for visitors, young and old.

This drug store serves up delicious coned ice cream for visitors, young and old.

Potted Lantana brings curb appeal to busy streets.

Potted Lantana brings curb appeal to busy streets.

Classic. Southern. Character.

Classic. Southern. Character.

entrance
Traditional Greek revival style court house.

Traditional Greek revival style court house.

Lichen on post.

Lichen on post.

Staging our House Part I – How to Make a Door Wreath

wreath10After painting my door a bright Sherwin Williams white, I decided to hang a wreath to add a dash of color and personality.

I opted for a white door instead of a wild color, because it brought out the white trim of my house. Black or a dark color would have made my doorway (visually) recede, a bright green could turn off potential buyers, and red would have clashed with the lovely bricks. Besides, I had quite a bit of white paint left over from our painters.

So off I go to the stores to find a suitable and un-cheesy wreath that doesn’t look like it belongs on a tombstone in a forgotten graveyard, somewhere.

But, gasp! they cost, like, $69!!

What a budget-buster!

That’s when I gathered up supplies and made my own, and here is how I did it…

Supplies:

  • Twig wreath ($4.99 — Hobby Lobby)
  • Brown bead wire ($1.47 — Hobby Lobby)
  • Spanish moss ($1 — The Dollar Tree)
  • Random floral stems ($1 per stem — The Dollar Tree)
  • Ribbon or embellishment ($1 — The Dollar Tree)
  • Needle-nose pliers/wire-cutters (Free! — Borrowed from Lefty’s tool box)
  • Command Strips to hang wreath ($5.99 — Hobby Lobby)
  • wreath1 wreath3

    wreath2

    Instructions:

    1. Use wire cutters to remove flowers from the main stems. Keep the each flower’s stem long enough to weave into wreath.
    2. wreath5 wreath6
    3. Arrange flowers around wreath as desired (before permanently attaching them.)
    4. wreath4

    5. Weave each flower’s stem into the wreath.
    6. wreath7 wreath8
    7. Cut a small piece of brown bead wire into about 2″ pieces and wrap each wire around flower stem and wreath to hold stem into place. (Here is where the needle-nose pliers really come in handy. They are good at holding on to the little bitty wires and twisting it into place.)
    8. wreath9

    9. Repeat steps until entire wreath is complete.
    10. Embellish with Spanish Moss, if desired.

    Hints:

    I used brown wire because it’s the same color as the twigs. Floral wire is fine to use.

    To protect the paint on your door or walls, ensure that the sharp end of the wire is safely tucked or bent away from the back of the wreath.

    Total Cost: $17.47!! (Not including tax or the 40%-off Hobby Lobby coupon that I probably used!) Beats $69, doesn’t it!

    Let me know how yours turns out! :-)

    wreath10