Where were You on 9/11?

fire_station_flagThe flags look sad today.

They are flying at half mast.

It is overcast, and the wind is not blowing.

I feel sad, too.

Thirteen years ago today, militant extremists hijacked four of our own passenger airliners and ripped our hearts and sense of security.

I was working at one of those mail-room-type jobs that almost everyone has to go through to jump-start their careers. Therefore, I was able to see some of the 9/11 coverage before my supervisor said sadly, “We need to get back to work.” And so I did. But after a second plane struck a tower, I wondered what was happening to us.

Who would be next?

I knew that if our town–a defense town–got hit, I would walk to get Lefty, who was working at a nearby company.

I was proud of President George W. Bush on that day and still am. Kenneth T. Walsh (http://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/ken-walshs-washington/2013/04/25/george-w-bushs-bullhorn-moment) so accurately put it, “It was George W. Bush’s ‘bullhorn moment,’ one of the most riveting and important points in his presidency, illustrating the personal qualities he was most proud of: a pride in making decisions from the gut, an overwhelming trust in his instincts, a certain brio in how he conducted himself during a crisis.”[Emphasis mine.]

This moment is photographed in my memory and was President Bush’s finest hour. He was strong and resolute. Honorable, and certainly a Commander and Chief.

After 9/11, I learned words like al-Qaeda and Jihad. I’m not politically correct. Never have been. Never will be. Because I am a truth-seeker. So, as long as I am given freedom of speech in my country, I will speak the truth. And what happened on September 11, 2001 was evil, horrible, and unconscionable. The act was done by wicked men.

So, on this day of remembrance, I pray for the victims of 9/11, their families, and those who lost loved ones on that day.

In the words of George W. Bush, “God bless America.”

Fire Station.  In remembrance of our public service heroes who lost their lives on September 11th.

Fire Station. In remembrance of our public service heroes who lost their lives on September 11th.

United States of America flag at half mast.

United States of America flag at half mast.

The world's most beautiful flag.

The world’s most beautiful flag.

Harvest Fields

Shorn cornfield.

Shorn cornfield.

On Sunday I commented on the acres of corn that we passed by on the way to worship. Lefty reminded me that our acres were nothing compared to America’s breadbasket, but I’ve never lived there, so I wouldn’t know.

Yesterday, Princess Buttercup and I passed a huge, green machine that was chopping down the brown stalks of corn. I’m guessing that they had harvested it already and didn’t need the stalks anymore. I wish I could have seen how they harvested the corn without tearing down the stalks.

I clocked the big, green tractor at 5 MPH. We watched for awhile as the machine mowed over the corn stalks and shot the clippings from a pipe at the back of the tractor, dust and used corn husks flying everywhere.

We have another field near our house that is verdant and lush against the cerulean sky. It may be cotton, or soybeans, or something else. I don’t see beans growing, and I don’t see cotton blooms.

I just know that it’s pretty.

Used corn husks.

Used corn husks.

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Old farmhouse near the fields.

Old farmhouse near the fields.

Cotton?  Soybeans?

Cotton? Soybeans?

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Pretty mailbox!

Pretty mailbox!

My Flip Phone Foibles

cell phone2Here it is, folks. The ultimate in non-cool, old technology—the flip phone.

I have not upgraded in about 5 years. Everyone else wanders around town with their eyes glued to a screen and their thumbs pattering at a faster speed than I can type. I’m the one who hears a distinguishing ring, which I have to flip open to answer it.

“Excuse me, I’ve got to get that.”
Snap!

About a week after I bought the phone, 5 years ago, it slipped from my hands and landed on my knee. The battery compartment popped out and broke, so I have held the battery in place with tape ever since. Nice touch, huh?

And check out my hand, holding the phone. Yeah…it’s my Notepad app for my palm. Sometimes the text fades when I wash my palm, but it’s a little higher tech than tying a yellow ribbon around my finger to help me remember stuff. I mean, wouldn’t you agree?

I’m not criticizing those with smart phones. One of these days I’ll probably join the crowd and get one, but, as much as I like researching for articles, I really don’t enjoy trying to find the best deals on stuff like electronics. Not sure why, but I think it may have something to do with the fact that I like making money more than I like spending it. And I don’t want to sign a covenant that binds me to a cell phone company of all things.

If any of you out there know of a great deal on phones, please let me know so that I can join the masses. I’ll admit that I’ve been crouching behind a shrub when my phone rings. I’m not immune to the fear of being uncool. Please excuse me, now. I’ve got to get that.

Snap!

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High-Tech Town

shuttle2My faithful blog followers know just how much I enjoy photographing old houses and antiques.

But like I alluded to in my previous post, the majority of us live in your basic suburban ranch with granite counter tops and stainless steel appliances. (Well, not all of us…Lefty and I built before the latter became so popular around here.)

I decided to hit Huntsville with my trusty little Canon PowerShot–to show you another view of our little town.

The high-tech defense industry drives Huntsville’s economy. Our little rocket engines helped to send humans to the moon. We have the second largest research park in the United States, and if you aren’t an engineer yourself, you are probably married to one.

As I celebrate the Rocket City, today, I hope you’ll see Alabama in a new light! An ongoing joke around here is, “Well, it isn’t rocket science…Oh, wait…It is!

First of all, this is what it’s all about. We Alabamians love our country and what she stands for. We will fight ’til our dying breaths for those values.
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This little guy is our claim to fame--a rocket engine.

This little guy is our claim to fame–a rocket engine.

More rocket engines.

More rocket engines.

Kids come from all over to visit Space Camp and Aviation Challenge.  One day I'll have to tell you about when I was a counselor.

Kids come from all over to visit Space Camp and Aviation Challenge. One day I’ll have to tell you about when I was a counselor.

Woooooosh!!!!!!!!!!!

Woooooosh!!!!!!!!!!! The Saturn V rocket graces Huntsville’s skyline.

Earth to Mars...Earth to Mars...this is Stephanie speaking...  :-P

Earth to Mars…Earth to Mars…this is Stephanie speaking… :-P

One of the many companies in Research Park.

One of the many companies in Research Park.

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We've got your back, America.  SAIC is one of the defense contractors in town.

We’ve got your back, America. SAIC is one of the defense contractors in town.

research

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Agriculture meets high-tech on the skirts of Research Park.

Agriculture meets high-tech on the skirts of Research Park.

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We're also home to the Redstone Arsenal.

We’re also home to the Redstone Arsenal.

UAH breeds more and more engineers.

UAH breeds more and more engineers.

materials_science2

research_institute

Our new mega-Belk is being built at Bridge Street...a shopping center built at the fringe of Research Park. Our new mega-Belk is being built at Bridge Street…a shopping center built at the fringe of Research Park.[/caption]